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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Bernard
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-14T03:08:50Z
dc.date.available2015-10-14T03:08:50Z
dc.date.issued1958
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/56282
dc.descriptionBernard Smith was an Australian art historian, art critic and academic, including at the University of Melbourne. He has been described as the founder of Australian Art History, and his presence and influence in Australian cultural life immense. This is one of many of his lectures given in the Fine Arts Department of the University of Melbourne between 1956 and 1966 and at a time when it was the only art history department in an Australian university. They are lectures in the history of art that range from Palaeolithic to the Romantic Movement. These lectures are presented as originally written and are archival in nature with no attempt to bring them up-to-date. They belong to their time.
dc.description.abstractNeither the Minoans nor the Mycenaeans of the Bronze Age made a practice of building temples. They used caves or mountain shrines or fitted up one or two rooms in a palace for the worship of their gods. But for the Greeks, temples were important, not as places of worship, but as shrines for the deity. The early temples of the Geometric and Orientalizing periods, that is, from the 10th century down to about 600 B.C., were very simple structures, consisting of timber and sun-dried brick. Several shapes were at first used, but the rectangular temple, which enclosed a cult statue of the god or goddess in its cella, soon became the dominant type. A porch was often added before the entrance, the porch being supported simply by extending the side walls, or by using a few timber posts. Sometimes the eaves of the temple were increased to for a veranda around the whole building, the roof being supported by wood posts or pillars. The verandas served to protect the walls from sun and rain, and also provided shelter. Colonnades were of course widely used by the Egyptians as internal roof supports and the Minoans made use of the colonnaded courtyard, a practice also much used by the Greeks in their market places and gymnasia. A gymnasium, for instance frequently consisted of a colonnaded courtyard which led off to rooms arranged around a square or rectangle. But in the Greek temple the colonnade becomes and important external feature.
dc.subjectArchitecture, Ancient
dc.subjectGreece
dc.titleGreek architecture and temple decoration
dc.typeLecture
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Culture and Communication
melbourne.affiliation.facultyHistory of the University of Melbourne
melbourne.contributor.authorSmith, Bernard
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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